2015 Participant Summaries

2018 Participant Summaries

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Study:

The frequency of kissing as part of sexual activity differs depending on how men meet their male casual sexual partners.

Researchers:

Cornelisse VJ, Priest D, Fairley CK, Walker S, Bradshaw CS, Phillips T, Chow EPF

Publication:

International Journal of STD & AIDS 2018, 29(6): 598 - 602 doi: 10.1177/0956462417748717

Summary:

This was a questionnaire-based study of men who have sex with men (MSM) attending Melbourne Sexual Health Centre, Australia, between March and September 2015. We measured differences in kissing practices among MSM who use different methods to find male casual sexual partners. We surveyed 753 MSM around the age of 29 years. Most of the men (80%) had used apps in the last 3 months to find casual sex partners. Users of apps had a higher number of casual sex partners than non-users and also kissed more casual partners than non-users. We are also investigating whether kissing is an important way of spreading gonorrhoea infection.


Study:

Risk factors for oropharyngeal gonorrhoea in men who have sex with men: an age-matched case–control study

Researchers:

Vincent J Cornelisse, Sandra Walker, Tiffany Phillips, Jane S Hocking, Catriona S Bradshaw, David A Lewis, Garrett Paul Prestage, Andrew E Grulich, Christopher K Fairley, Eric P F Chow

Publication:

Sex Transm Infect Published Online First: 22 January 2018 2018 doi: 10.1136/sextrans-2017-053381

Summary:

In 2015, we compared MSM of similar age who attended the Melbourne Sexual Health Centre and had either tested positive or negative for throat gonorrhoea. We looked at which oral sex practices were important risk factors for spreading throat gonorrhoea including tongue kissing, receptive oro-penile sex (fellatio) or insertive oro-anal sex (rimming), and whether the use of mouthwash every day and recent antibiotics would protect against getting infection. The highest risk factor for gonorrhoea throat infection was the number of casual sex partners. Throat gonorrhoea was not associated with insertive oro-anal sex or mouthwash use. The finding that throat gonorrhoea was associated with a higher number of sexual partners but not specific sexual practices highlights the need for further research in the area of how gonorrhoea is transmitted.


Study:

Evaluation of the implementation of a new nurse-led express ‘Test-And-Go’ HIV/STI testing service for men who have with men at a sexual health centre in Melbourne, Australia

Researchers:

Chow EPF, Fortune R, Dobinson S, Wakefield T, Read TRH, Chen MY, Bradshaw CS, Fehler G, Fairley CK

Publication:

Sexually Transmitted Diseases 2018, 45 (6): 429-433

Summary:

In August 2015, a new by appointment nurse-led express HIV/STI testing service “Test-And-Go” (TAG) for asymptomatic men who have sex with men (MSM) was introduced at Melbourne Sexual Health Centre in response to the increase in demand for services. We compared asymptomatic MSM who attended the TAG service to MSM who attended the clinic and received the standard walk-in consultation service. Consultation and waiting times for both services were calculated. The average waiting time for the TAG service (8 minutes) was 45 minutes less than the routine walk-in service (53 minutes). The consultation time in the TAG service (9 minutes) was less than the routine walk-in service (18 minutes). The TAG service required less waiting and consultation time and created additional clinical capacity at the general clinic to see clients at higher risk.



Study:

Combined oral and topical antimicrobial therapy for male partners of women with bacterial vaginosis: tolerability, acceptability and impact on the genital microbiota of couples

Researchers:

Plummer EL, Vodstrcil LA, Danielewski JA, Murray GL, Fairley CK, Garland SM, Hocking JS, Tabrizi SN, Bradshaw CS

Publication:

PLOS ONE 2018, 13(1): e0190199 doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0190199

Summary:

We report that treatment of the male partner of women with bacterial vaginosis (BV) is acceptable and treatment was tolerable. Current treatments for BV are associated with unacceptably high recurrence rates. We observed low recurrence of BV in a group of women with a past history of BV who were having unprotected sex with a regular partner following treatment and treatment of their partner. This study supports the need for larger studies with longer follow up to assess the impact on BV recurrence.



Study:
Associations between anorectal chlamydia and oro-anal sex or saliva use as a lubricant for anal sex: A cross-sectional survey

Researchers: 
Cornelisse V, Fairley CK, Read TRH, Lee D, Walker S, Hocking JS, Chen MY, Bradshaw CS, Chow EPF

Publication:
Sexually Transmitted Diseases January 2018 doi: 10.1097/OLQ.0000000000000800

Summary:
Questions on receptive rimming, receptive fingering or penis “dipping”, and the use of a partner’s saliva as anal lubricant were completed by men who have sex with men (MSM) who were tested for anorectal chlamydia. The use of a partner’s saliva during receptive anal sex practices such as rimming, fingering or penis dipping were weak risk factors for getting anorectal chlamydia in MSM. This is different to our previously reported findings that the use of saliva as anal lubricant is more strongly associated with anorectal gonorrhoea



Study:
‘It Opened My Eyes’ – examining the impact of a multifaceted chlamydia testing intervention on general practitioners using Normalization Process Theory

Researchers:
Yeung A, Hocking J, Guy R, Fairley CK, Smith K, Vaisey A, Donovan B, Imrie J, Gunn J, Temple-Smith M

Publication:
Family Practice March 2018 doi:10.1093/fampra/cmy011

Summary:
Chlamydia is the most common notifiable sexually transmissible infection in Australia. Left untreated, it can develop into pelvic inflammatory disease and infertility. The majority of notifications come from general practice and it is ideally situated to test young Australians. The Australian Chlamydia Control Effectiveness Pilot (ACCEPt) was a multifaceted intervention that aimed to reduce chlamydia prevalence by increasing testing in 16- to 29-year-olds attending general practice. GPs were interviewed to describe the effectiveness of the ACCEPt intervention in integrating chlamydia testing into routine practice using Normalization Process Theory (NPT). The theory has four elements: understanding of the intervention by clinic staff, commitment and engagement to the intervention, work carried out to make the intervention function and evaluation of the intervention. GPs were purposively selected based on age, gender, geographic location and size of practice at baseline and midpoint. Interview data were analysed regarding the intervention components and results were interpreted using NPT. A total of 44 GPs at baseline and 24 at midpoint were interviewed. Most GPs reported offering a test based on age at midpoint versus offering a test based on symptoms or patient request at baseline. Quarterly feedback was the most significant ACCEPt component for facilitating a chlamydia test. The ACCEPt intervention has been able to moderately normalize chlamydia testing among GPs, although the components had varying levels of effectiveness. NPT can demonstrate the effective implementation of an intervention in general practice and has been valuable in understanding which components are essential and which components can be improved upon.